Camden Rocks Festival 2017

 

 

The Damned headline Camden Rocks Festival 2017Having announced The Damned, Orange Goblin and Ruts DC amongst the first acts to be confirmed for Camden Rocks Festival 2017, today Sheffield’s recently reformed indie pioneers Milburn join the line-up, alongside Camden’s own Carl Barat & The Jackals, The Rifles, The King Blues, The Membranes and many more.

Following a sold-out fifth year in 2016, this year will see Camden Rocks Festival up the stakes again, set to host a staggering 250 bands and artists across 25 of Camden Town’s venues on June 3rd 2017.

“We can’t wait to play this year’s Camden Rocks Festival, a great line up as always and right in our own back yard!” say The Rifles.

“Camden Rocks is the weekend when Camden comes as alive as it ever was and should always be. I’m always proud to be a part of it.” Carl Barat adds.

Speaking ahead of The King Blues’ appearance, frontman Itch says, “We are ridiculously excited to be playing at Camden Rocks this year. Camden was where we cut our teeth and has been a spiritual home for us. I can’t wait for this one!”

Camden Rocks 2017 will also host a special reformation from original Sex Pistols drummer Paul Cook’s The Professionals, and in addition to Milburn, Carl Barat & The Jackals, The King Blues, The Rifles and The Membranes, Andy Cairns of alt-metal mainstays Therapy? will also perform an acoustic set.

“I’m honoured and excited to be part of the burgeoning Camden Rocks festival this year,” Cairns says. “My previous experience of the event was amazing and I’m very much looking forward to getting stuck in to 2017’s chapter. See you there!”

Further line-up additions are noted below in bold.

The Damned, Orange Goblin, The Ruts DC, The King Blues, The Professionals, Hey! Hello!, Anti Nowhere League, The Urban Voodoo Machine, The RainBand, Young Kato, Stone Broken, Big Boy Bloater and the Limits, MOSES, Screaming Eagles, Imperial Leisure, Habitats, The Main Grains, Napoleon, Slydigs, Max Raptor, Losers, Cortes, Colour Of Noise, Courage My Love, Black Orchid Empire, Jasmine Rodgers, Straight Lines, Yonaka, Exist Immortal, The Anita Chellamah Band, Dirty Thrills, The Blinders, Inklings, MassMatiks, Hands Off Gretel, Fizzy Blood, Broken Witt Rebels, Louise Distras, Millie Manders & The ShutUp, Forte, Stereo Juggernaut, Black Sixteen, Lucie Barat & The Au Revoirs, HVMM, Halflives, Weirds, Frauds, Holding Absence, When We Were Wolves, Bare Knuckle Parade, Lupus-Dei, Liines, Tigress, Divides, Single By Sunday, John, Desert Planes, Happy Accidents, Brandy Row, Role Models, Tim Muddiman & The Strange, Chinese Missy, Alana Bondi, Itamar, Oxygen Thief, The Franklys, CUTE CUTE DEΔTH, Heel, The Kut, Secret Cameras, Yungblud, Kidbrother & Veridian.

Camden Rocks Festival 2017 venues include: Koko, Electric Ballroom, Underworld, Camden Market Amphitheatre, Dingwalls, Proud, Camden Assembly, The Black Heart, The Monarch, The Forge, The Crowndale, Dublin Castle, Devonshire Arms, Irish Centre, Dingwalls Canal side, Bloc Bar, Hawley Arms, Good Mixer, Brew Dog, Fifty Five, Be At One & Winnicott.

Camden Rocks Festival 2017 Poster
Camden Rocks Festival 2017 Poster

Camden Rocks Festival 2017 tickets are now available

 

Jake Bugg to headline Cambridge Folk Festival 2017

Cambridge Folk Festival 2017
Cambridge Folk Festival 2017

Cambridge Folk Festival is delighted to reveal the first artists for next year’s bill including one of Britain’s most exciting talents Jake Bugg, who the Festival have invited to return to headline Sunday night with an acoustic set.

Jake Bugg
Jake Bugg

Jake Bugg’s progress from performing in 2012 at the Festival’s smallest stage, The Den, to headlining Stage 1 is a feat matched only by one other artist, Passenger.

Hayseed Dixie
Hayseed Dixie

Also confirmed are: folk and roots pioneers Oysterband (Sunday), celebrating their 40th anniversary; multi-award winning, visionary folk trio Lau (Saturday), featuring Kris Drever, Martin Green and Aidan O’Rourke and US ‘rockgrass’ favourites Hayseed Dixie (Sunday).

They join previously announced Guest Curator Jon Boden, who will perform over the Festival weekend with The Remnant Kings to preview his autumn 2017 album as well as guest curating elements of the line-up.

Cambridge Folk Festival 2017 Tickets are now on sale:

Full Festival ticket: £167
Day tickets: £27.50 (Thu), £59.50 (Fri), £70 (Sat), £70 (Sun)

Camping at Cherry Hinton Hall and Coldham’s Common is available. Concession tickets (disabled access and carer, Under 21, Cambridge City Resident) are available. Please see the website for more information and full ticket prices: www.cambridgefolkfestival.co.uk

Cambridge Folk Festival is held over four days in the picturesque grounds of Cherry Hinton Hall. Celebrated for its relaxed atmosphere, excellent facilities and diverse programme, the Festival brings together the best of folk in its broadest sense, from international stars to breakthrough new artists and special one-off performances, talks and workshops across several stages. Previous headliners have included: Joan Baez, Nick Cave, Ray Davies, Buddy Guy, Christy Moore, Van Morrison, James Taylor and The Waterboys amongst many others.

Cambridge Folk Festival is promoted by Cambridge Live with support from Cambridge City Council.

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Kodiak Island featuring Jo Bartlett to release debut album

Kodiak Island featuring Jo Bartlett debut album 'The Golden Section'
Kodiak Island featuring Jo Bartlett

The D.I.Y. ethic runs deep for Jo Bartlett. As a teenager she started her own club, The Buzz Club so her band, Bluetrain, could support her favourite artists.

When she and her partner Danny Hagan recorded ‘Lank Haired Girl To Bearded Boy’ as It’s Jo and Danny they set up their own Double Snazzy label to release it; and when It’s Jo and Danny wanted to play a festival, they started their own, The Green Man.

After the split of The Yellow Moon Band, Jo and Danny’s last musical project together, Jo released a couple of solo albums and formed a band around her to play live. The band has now become much more than a solo project.

Listen to the album track ‘Second Around Time’

Kodiak Island are:
Jo Bartlett – Vocals and guitar
Richard Handyside – Guitar, flute and vocals
Mike Muggeridge – Bass guitar
Gareth Palmer – Cajon, percussion and vocals

Kodiak Island live Dates (with more to be arranged):
Always The Sun Festival – Guildford September 11th
Supporting Dodgy at the West End Centre Aldershot October 1st

Kodiak Island featuring Jo Bartlett debut album ‘The Golden Section’ is scheduled for released on Musical BEAR on 7th October, 2016.

Pop South Festival Glasgow – Saturday 13th February 2016

Occasional Flickers, a band name to make every poster maker think carefully about the fonts used to advertise their gigs, had a stand-up drummer and beards-a-go-go, although they paid the price of being first on as there were barely more people watching than performing. Veering from vaguely akin to Veronica Falls to something altogether more jangly, they reinforced the unwritten rule that every band first on each day mustn’t be too challenging for any lurking hungover souls. The disappointing sight of what appeared to be a “man-bun”, lost them a couple of points but there were extremely considerate regarding time management, as they were keen not to run out of songs before their slot was up, something they managed admirably.

Milky Wimpshake - (c) Robin Halls
Milky Wimpshake - (c) Robin Halls

Thirty minutes spent in the company of Milky Wimpshake will always be a worthwhile investment.

They were utterly professional throughout and rattled off a selection of new and old songs, accompanied by Sophie on vocals for the newer ones – something that works rather well. It might just be me, but I always take delight in listening out for mentions of Gormenghast in the lyrics and it makes me smile when it does. One day, I’ll get round to asking Pete just how many there are.

I’d always been meaning to explore MJ Hibbert and the Validators, as I’ve liked what I’ve heard and in our house the Christmas album gets dug out each year, to add that year’s new track to and to brighten up a generally over-rated time of year.

I really enjoyed them. Having one band member standing at the side of the stage with a pile of cardboard sheets to use as props bode well for later on and so it proved, guiding us through things to do before you’re thirty. Sadly, I

seem to have missed a fair few and am too late to catch up. As many of the songs were, appropriately enough, about getting older, I did allow myself an ironic smirk that I was watching them while drinking a mug of tea and celebrating reaching my half-century.

Mammoth Penguins finished off the first half of the day in fine style, allowing us to catch up with what Emma’s been up to lately. There’s a harder edge here, compared to other recent outings I’ve witnessed and her voice shows

no sign of losing either its distinctive qualities or its power. This lot had been on the list to dive further into for far too long and, on this evidence, would repay the effort. The CD has now been ordered, although quite why I didn’t just buy it up there I don’t know…

Considerately, they were careful not to run over time, as there was an hour break for grub after them, before the eagerly anticipated evening session got underway.

A very swift curry later and we were back in position for what was expected to be a pretty cracking evening line-up, kicking off with the ever wonderful The School. I’d been wondering how all eight of them were going to fit onto what certainly wasn’t an overly large stage but, as they were two light, it was just a cosy fit rather than a major problem.

I don’t know how many times I’ve had the pleasure of their company now but it’s always an absolute blast and, in an ideal world, I’d have them play a gig locally every month or two and I’d genuinely not tire of it. All three albums are a joy and they consistently give me a great deal of pleasure.

While I’m more than happy to traipse around the country watching bands like this in the company of like-minded people, why aren’t these bands getting more back for their efforts? I was persuaded to watch some of the Brit Awards this week and, apart from having Sleaford Mods lyrics running round my head throughout, contrasting that artificial world of false camaraderie, hype and lack of any real talent or soul against the genuine thing in Glasgow was striking, if ultimately depressing.

Hot on their numerous collective heels, were Chorusgirl, another band I was particularly looking forward to seeing. To heighten my enjoyment, I’d also managed to secure a highly desirable position to watch them from, being about six feet from both bar and stage. You don’t get that at the O2.

Bedecked in matching T-Shirts, they lived up to pre-festival expectations and then some. Glorious songs delivered beautifully. You can’t really ask for much more.

One point struck me around now; the use of digital tuners. Is it me or do they encourage constant checking? It’s not a criticism, more an observation. Were things less in tune when they didn’t exist? Surely modern guitars hold their tune just as well or better than older kit? Anyone care to shed any light on this?

Tigercats. The wonderful, wonderful Tigercats. A band that just seem to keep getting better. Now with extra Paul Rains on guitar, surely they must be pretty much touching 11 on everyone’s personal scale of all that is good and wholesome in the world?

On this evidence that certainly are and they had the whole crowd in their hands from the moment they stepped onto the stage, bathed as it was in some rather unexpected red lights. We were treated to a scattering of new songs which hints that, after the more subtle approach of Mysteries, they intend to rocking out a bit more. Frankly, it doesn’t much matter what style or avenues they choose, if they continue to produce stuff of this quality.

Isle of Dogs was an instant attention grabbing album whereas Mysteries took time to bed in before narrowly edging ahead, in my book. Can they beat that standard with their third album? I hope so but the world may just explode with pleasure if they do. I certainly will.

They were as close to perfect here as I’ve experienced from any half-hour of my life.

Trust Fund closed the day and had a pretty short straw in having to follow Duncan and crew. However, the crowd were in a suitably good frame of mind to see past the various technical issues that they suffered and they gave an almighty performance, as befits a headline act.

Veering from noisy as hell to gentle and subtle, often in the same song, Ellis’ excellent vocals and arrangements gave us exactly what was needed. “Make it bleed!”

And so to the end of a superb day’s entertainment. Home to bed and the chance to do it all again the following day. Why isn’t every weekend like this?

Pop South Festival, Glasgow – Friday 12th February 2016

A bitterly cold weekend with intermittent snow – actual proper snow that we’re not used in the soft south – in a city that, if judged purely aesthetically, is always going to struggle to fight off being described as ‘brutal’ may not be considered a classic way to mark a significant birthday (as I have been repeatedly told this year apparently is) but it proved, in all ways, just about a perfect way to do just that.

I can only imagine what motivates the fine folk such as Pop South to organise events like these – it certainly won’t be the money. Maybe it’s the satisfaction of looking round a packed hall where people are obviously having a massively good time while the finest bands around churn out fab tune after fab tune, knowing that they made it happen. Whatever it is, long may it continue, as it allows those of us lucky enough to be able to get along to escape from reality for a few days. I don’t know about you but I need things like this to sustain me through the grind of everyday life.

Friday night’s openers were Joyce Delaney, a three-piece with bags of energy and enthusiasm, who made an early claim for the coveted ‘best looking bass of the weekend’ award. Chuck in a mass of enthusiasm, confidence, audience interaction and clap-a-long songs and we were definitely on to an early winner. In my excitement to capture my thoughts, my rapidly scrawled notes from their set included what appear to be the words “familiar pluty rap ham”, for no obvious reason. It was a only slightly gloomy in there and I was only on my first pint at this stage so I have no idea what I was moved to write down or why it ended up as it did. Perhaps they could write a song with that title and I’ll look like I was just ahead of the game, rather than a bit of an arse?

Jutland Songs took over and their fuller and more powerful sound kept the mood of optimism sustained. However, they lacked the confidence and attitude of the openers and were subsequently more of a slow burner than their short set really allowed for.

The splendidly named Breakfast Muff gave us masses of chorusy-fuzz, played for periods with their backs to the audience and swapped instruments at the drop of a plectrum. Two chorded noisy pop songs delivered with a sledgehammer force are pretty much irresistible and I lapped them up.

I’d seen The Tuts before and been underwhelmed by them, although that was a few years ago. Times move on and they blew me away here, though. Singer/guitarist Nadia led them through their excellent Clash-esque set with barely time to draw breath. I’m sure there couldn’t have been a toe in the room that remained untapped as they put every ounce of their heart and soul into the performance.

They are recording their debut album at the moment and need your help to pay for it. They have a Pledge website where you can choose just how far you’re prepared to go to support their efforts. I’ve chipped in and look forward to hearing the album: I recommend you do the same. We really do need to cherish and support bands like them, as we do for all the acts that played this weekend and other events like it, whenever and wherever they are.